2014 Dubious Innovations In Cardiology Reply

 

  • Dubious Innovative Device: Renal Denervation
  • Dubious Innovative Business Strategy: Health Diagnostics Laboratory
  • Dubious Innovations In Leadership (Tie): The European Society of Cardiology and The Institute of Medicine
  • Dubious Innovative Breakthrough Therapy That Never Actually Breaks Through Anything (repeat winner): Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

 

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

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Cardiology Drugs Of The Year: New, Old, And Not-So-Funny 1

New Drug Of The Year: LCZ696 from Novartis

Old Drug of the Year: Ezetimibe

Not-So-Funny Drug of the Year: Ivabradine

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Embattled Stem Cell Researchers Sue Harvard And Brigham And Women’s Hospital Reply

Two embattled and highly controversial stem cell researchers are suing the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School for an ongoing investigation into their research. The investigation has already resulted in the retraction of one paper in Circulation and an expression of concern about another paper in the Lancet.

The suit was filed by Piero Anversa, the highly prominent stem cell researcher who is a Harvard professor and the head of a large lab at the Brigham, and his longtime colleague, Annarosa Leri, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard who has coauthored many papers with Anversa. The suit places the blame for any scientific misconduct relating to the two papers on a third colleague and coauthor, Jan Kajstura, their longtime collaborator.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

New Devices May Bring Improved Treatment To Stroke Patients Reply

A large new trial provides the first substantial evidence that new devices can improve the outcome of patients who have acute ischemic stroke. Earlier, less sophisticated versions of the devices had produced disappointing results in clinical trials. The previous trials may also have been hindered by long treatment delays and difficulties in recruiting suitable patients. The new devices are retrievable stents that extract blood clots from inside vessels.

MR CLEAN (The Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands), published in the New England Journal of Medicine today,  was designed to address the limitations of these previous trials. 500 patients with ischemic stroke were randomized to usual care or the addition of intraarterial treatment within 6 hours of symptom onset.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Continuing Medical Education Payments To Physicians Will Be Exposed To Sunshine Reply

After a long and complicated struggle it now appears highly likely that industry will be required to disclose payments to physicians for continuing medical education (CME). This decision from CMS, which I am told by reliable sources is final, follows a long period in which CMS appeared to waver in its approach to incorporating CME into the Sunshine Act.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

No Advantage For Low Glycemic Index Diet Reply

In recent years the glycemic index (GI), a measure of a carbohydrate’s impact on blood sugar, has assumed a major role in discussions about diets and nutrition. Now a new study suggests that by itself, within the context of an otherwise healthy diet, GI may not be an important factor in improving cardiovascular risk.

In a paper published in JAMA, Frank Sacks and colleagues report the results of a randomized, crossover-controlled 5-week feeding trial comparing 4 different diets in 163 overweight or obese adults. The diets were either low- or high-carb and either low- or high-GI. Importantly, all the diets were based on previously established healthy dietary patterns based on the DASH diet, which is low in saturated and total fat and includes substantial amounts of fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Get Rid of Sugar, Not Salt, Say Authors Reply

Too much negative attention has been focused on salt and not enough on sugar, write two authors in Open Heart. Reviewing the extensive literature on salt and sugar, they write that the adverse effects of salt are less than the adverse effects of sugar. The evidence supporting efforts to reduce salt in the diet is not convincing and we would be far better off reducing sugar instead of salt in the modern diet.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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New Drug From Isis Breaks Important Ground But Unlikely To Dent The Market Reply

The first important results with a new drug under development by Isis Pharmaceuticals may well have an enormous long term impact on our understanding of how blood flows through the body and how that same blood forms clots in response to damage and disease. But it appears unlikely that the new drug– an anticoagulant unlike anything else now available–  will have a major impact on the large and important anticoagulant market.

FXI-ASO, under development by Isis, is an antisense oligonucleotide that reduces the level of factor XI, a key component of the intrinsic (contact) coagulation pathway. All the currently available anticoagulants target the extrinsic (tissue factor) coagulation pathway.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes, including detailed perspectives by Sanjay Kaul and Ethan Weiss.

 

Women: Don’t Use Aspirin For Routine Prevention Of Heart Attacks, Stroke, And Cancer Reply

Although once widely recommended, aspirin for the prevention of a first heart attack or stroke (primary prevention) has lost favor in recent years, as the large number of bleeding complications appeared to offset the reduction in cardiovascular events. But at the same time evidence has emerged demonstrating the long-term effect of aspirin in preventing colorectal cancer, leading some to think that the risk-to-benefit equation for aspirin should be reconsidered.

Investigators in the Women’s Health Study therefore analyzed long-term followup data from 27,939 women who were randomized to placebo or 100 mg aspirin every other day.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

No, The Mediterranean Diet Won’t Help You Live Forever Reply

A new study published today provides fresh evidence for the healthful effects of the Mediterranean Diet. It even suggests that people who follow the Mediterranean Diet may live longer than people on most other diets. And this is just the latest piece of good news about this diet to appear in the last few years. But I want to warn my readers not to go overboard with this study. It appears to be an excellent, well-performed study, but it has many inherent limitations and is by no means definitive. In the long run it may raise as many questions as it answers.

The new study, published in The BMJfinds that women who more closely followed a Mediterranean diet had longer telomeres on the end of their chromosomes…

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Study Suggests Epinephrine for Cardiac Arrest May Be Harmful Reply

Epinephrine has been a cornerstone of therapy during cardiac resuscitation after cardiac arrest because of its well-established ability to stimulate the heart and increase the probability of a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). In recent years, however, concerns have been raised that people treated with epinephrine may have worse neurological outcomes following their resuscitation.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, French researchers analyzed data from more than 1,500 patients who were successfully resuscitated after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and were subsequently treated at a large hospital in Paris….

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.