Can You Test A Drug And Also Say Negative Things About It? 8

In my last post I raised the possibility that Steve Nissen, a highly influential cardiologist who has been an outspoken critic of industry influence in medicine, might have his own conflict of interest (COI) problem. In response, another cardiologist, James Stein, said that my post was unfair in its treatment of Nissen and failed to consider important distinctions and subtleties in the academic literature about conflict of interest.

Let me first of all confess that Stein– for whom I have the highest possible regard– makes some excellent points. And I further admit that my piece pretty much ignored some of these fine academic distinctions. But I also think it’s likely that we may have a forest and trees situation here and that by focusing on subtle COI distinctions it is possible to lose sight of the larger issue.

A Simple Test

Rather than focus on the subtle distinctions between different types of COI I’d like to propose a much simpler way to think about this problem as it exists in the real world. Here’s the test I would propose: can you imagine Nissen, or indeed anyone in a similar situation (running a large multimillion dollar trial of a drug) publicly saying something decidedly negative or critical about the drug?

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Steven Nissen, Conflicts Of Interest, And The New Cholesterol Drugs 6

(Updated)

Does Steve Nissen, an outspoken critic of inappropriate industry influence in medicine, have his own conflict of interest problem?

This week Nissen, the chief of cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic, was widely quoted in news reports about the FDA advisory panels evaluating two new highly promising cholesterol drugs from Amgen and Sanofi/Regeneron.

Nissen was broadly supportive of the drugs. Although he has been one of the leading voices against approving and using drugs based solely on their effect on surrogate outcomes, he was much more liberal about these drugs than some other experts and many of the panel members. Here’s what he told CNBC:

“I am somebody who generally is opposed to approving drugs on the basis of surrogate endpoints without the outcome data,” Nissen said by telephone Wednesday, referring to lowering of LDL cholesterol already shown by the medicine. “However, in this case, I actually support approval and I actually think the concerns of the committee are not on target.”

On the NBC Nightly News program he was even more effusive:

“These drugs are breakthrough drugs, they are blockbuster drugs that are very likely going to have a big impact.”

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FDA Advisory Panel Gives Tepid Support To New Daiichi Sankyo Drug Reply

On Thursday the FDA’s Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee voted 9-1 in favor of approval for Daiichi Sankyo’s edoxaban(Savaysa), but the outcome will likely result in a drug that will be on the market but that few physicians will prescribe until further studies are performed.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.