No Benefit For A Commonly Used Cardiac Device Reply

Once again, after decades of common use, a frequently implanted device has been found to confer no benefit whatsoever over a much less invasive therapy. Cardiologists and radiologists often implant the device, called a retrievable inferior vena cava filter, inside people who are at high risk for developing potentially lethal blood clots. The filter is designed to prevent pulmonary embolism, an extremely dangerous condition that occurs when a blood clot from the legs migrates into the lungs. Now a new study published in JAMA shows that these devices provide no advantage over anticoagulant drugs which thin the blood.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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New Drug From Isis Breaks Important Ground But Unlikely To Dent The Market Reply

The first important results with a new drug under development by Isis Pharmaceuticals may well have an enormous long term impact on our understanding of how blood flows through the body and how that same blood forms clots in response to damage and disease. But it appears unlikely that the new drug– an anticoagulant unlike anything else now available–  will have a major impact on the large and important anticoagulant market.

FXI-ASO, under development by Isis, is an antisense oligonucleotide that reduces the level of factor XI, a key component of the intrinsic (contact) coagulation pathway. All the currently available anticoagulants target the extrinsic (tissue factor) coagulation pathway.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes, including detailed perspectives by Sanjay Kaul and Ethan Weiss.

 

Study Finds Flaws in New Treatment For Blood Clots Reply

In recent years, catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) has been added to the current standard of anticoagulation therapy in some patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The hope was that CDT would help reduce the high rate of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), but now an observational study finds no benefits and some important disadvantages associated with CDT.

In a report published in JAMA Internal Medicine, Riyaz Bashir and colleagues analyzed data from more than 90,000 patients hospitalized for DVT, 3649 of whom received CDT plus anticoagulation.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.