Prominent Harvard Cardiologist Moves To Google X To Head Large Study Reply

Here’s a clear sign of the ascending role of digital/precision/personalized medicine: a prominent cardiologist has left a top academic and clinical position in Boston to run a large, innovative study in Silicon Valley. Jessica Mega was widely perceived as a rising star at Harvard Medical School and the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She has now joined Google X, Google’s research arm, where she will head up the much publicized Baseline Study.

“I’m jealous,” said one academic cardiologist at a top hospital, upon hearing the news.

Baseline is one of the ambitious projects undertaken by the life sciences division of Google X….

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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Precision Medicine Approaches Peak Hype Reply

No, Personalized Medicine Isn’t Going To Save $600 Billion Over 50 Years By Preventing Heart Disease

The hype over personalized medicine has now reached astonishing new heights.  In an article published in the Lancet, Victor Dzau, the new president of the Institute of Medicine, and coauthors write that personalized and precision medicine (PPM) could deliver hundreds of billions of dollars worth of improved health in the US over the next 50 years.

They used a health simulation model to estimate the effect of improved screening and risk prediction to treat people at high risk for 6 diseases: cancer, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, lung disease, and stroke. They then calculated the resulting gains in life expectancy and quality-adjusted life expectancy.

They calculated that reducing heart disease by 50% “would generate a staggering $607 billion in improved health over 50 years.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Victor Dzau

Victor Dzau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genetic Study Suggests Possible Causal Role for LDL in Aortic Valve Disease Reply

Although LDL is an important risk factor for aortic valve disease, the precise role it plays has been uncertain. Lipid-lowering therapy in people with established aortic valve disease has not been shown to be beneficial. Now, however, a new genetic study published in JAMA suggests that LDL cholesterol may in fact cause an increase in aortic valve calcium and aortic valve stenosis. This may mean that LDL-lowering therapy could prove beneficial when given earlier in the disease process.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

The Y Chromosome May Explain Why Men Have Earlier Coronary Disease 1

The earlier onset of coronary artery disease in men has long provoked speculation and research. Now a new study in the Lancet suggests that common variations in the Y chromosome (which is transmitted directly from father to son and does not undergo recombination) may play an important role in the increased risk seen in men.

Using genetic information on the Y chromosome, an international team of researchers identified 9 different ancient lineages– haplogroups– in 3,233 British men. Two of the haplogroups accounted for nearly  90% of the subjects and men in one of these haplogroups, haplogroup I, had a 50% increase in the risk of coronary artery disease compared to  men with other haplotypes. This increase in risk was independent of other known risk factors. The investigators noted that haplogroup I appeared to exert a powerful effect on genes relating to inflammation and immunity. They further noted that haplotype I is generally more prevalent in northern than in southern Europe, and that this distribution is paralleled by an increased risk of coronary artery disease in northern Europe.

In an accompanying comment, Virginia Miller writes that the results of the study are “exciting because they identify a genetic haplotype linking response to infection (adaptive immunity) rather than innate immunity with perhaps an exaggerated inflammatory response and cardiovascular disease in men.”

Click here to read the press release from the Lancet…