Novartis’ Summer Blockbuster LCZ696 Gains A Name, Skips An Advisory Panel Reply

Entresto. That’s the brand name Novartis has chosen for LCZ696, its new heart failure drug that is expected to be a blockbuster. The name won’t be final until official confirmation, which comes with FDA approval. But Novartis will introduce the name for the first time this weekend in presentations at the European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure meeting in Seville, Spain.

FDA approval of Entresto is expected to occur by August at the latest. There are no apparent roadblocks to approval since Novartis has stated that it doesn’t expect an FDA advisory panel. Approval might well come earlier this summer.

At the ESC heart failure meeting this weekend Entresto investigators will also deliver some supporting secondary information about the drug….

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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New Heart Drug From Novartis: Will It Raise The Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease? Reply

LCZ696 is a heart failure drug from Novartis that many observers think will gain FDA approval later this year and go on to become a blockbuster. Perhaps the biggest obstacle to the drug’s success is the fear that it might raise the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Now a new article in a top cardiology journal lays out the detailed basis for this concern. The authors do not contend that the Alzheimer’s issue will likely ruin the drug’s chances, but they do maintain that the problem needs to be carefully monitored.

I spoke with Milton Packer, the co-principal investigator of PARADIGM-HF, the mega trial that set off the mega excitement about the drug last year. He offers several persuasive arguments that Alzheimer’s disease won’t be the Achilles’ heel of LCZ696.

But first let’s look at the paper…

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

An Emerging Consensus About Novartis’s New Potential Blockbuster Reply

Last year it became clear that Novartis had a potential blockbuster with its new heart failure drug, LCZ696, which is an angiotensin receptor- neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) consisting of the company’s own well-known angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan (Diovan) and a novel compound, the neprilysin inhibitor sacubitiril. The results of the PARADIGM trial, which was stopped early because of a large and highly significant reduction in cardiovascular mortality, electrified the cardiovascular community. But the trial also sparked a lot of controversy when skeptics raised questions suggesting that the results were not nearly as impressive as the investigators reported.

Following the initial excitement and discussion we are now starting to get a more measured and realistic view of the drug and the trial. In recent days two important secondary PARADIGM papers have been published. A paper in Circulation looks at the experience of trial participants who didn’t die. A paper in European Heart Journal performs some sophisticated statistical wizardry to estimate how LCZ696 would have performed against placebo instead of an active comparator. It will probably come as no surprise that both papers are highly positive. The Circulation paper shows that LCZ696 was effective in preventing progression of heart failure. The EHJ paper concludes that if it had been compared to placebo in a contemporary, otherwise well-treated population LCZ696 would have produced “striking reductions in cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, as well as heart failure hospitalization.”

Far more important than these papers, in my view, are the accompanying editorials. The Circulation editorialist, Henry Krum, is an influential Australian cardiologist and the EHJ editorialist, Duke University cardiologist Rob Califf, is one of the most influential and respected cardiologists in the world…

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

PARADIGM-HF Establishes a New Paradigm for Heart Failure Treatment Reply

So far as I can tell the only problem with PARADIGM-HF is that the results are so good that it’s boring. Anyone interested can reasonably assume that what they hear or read about PARADIGM-HF — and cardiologists will be seeing and hearing an awful lot about it —  will be overwhelmingly positive.

Briefly, the trial did everything its sponsor (Novartis) and its investigators (led by Milton Packer and John McMurray) hoped. It met all its major endpoints in all the subgroups without raising any sort of a safety signal. If the findings are confirmed after a rigorous FDA review, then Novartis will likely have a blockbuster on its hand.

All the excitement is over a new drug still known only by its number, LCZ696.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes, including a detailed interview with Milton Packer.

 

Predicting PARADIGM-HF, Or What To Expect When You’re Expecting Reply

The wait is almost over. For the last 5 months the most eagerly awaited trial in the cardiovascular universe has been PARADIGM-HF, the large (8,500 patient) trial of a new and novel heart failure drug from Novartis. If reality lives up to the early hope and hype, the drug, LCZ696, could completely reshape the heart failure landscape and give Novartis that rarest of gems, a new and genuine blockbuster cardiovascular drug.

The main results of the trial will first be presented at a press conference in Barcelona, Spain this Saturday in connection with the annual meeting of the European College of Cardiology.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

A New Novartis Heart Failure Drug Might Be A Blockbuster Reply

I try to avoid using words like “blockbuster” and “breakthrough” when writing about new drugs and treatments. I’ve been disappointed too many times. But, though they’ve been in short supply lately in cardiovascular medicine, sometimes there really are breakthroughs and blockbusters. In my career writing about cardiovascular medicine I’ve seen the introduction of the ACE inhibitors, statins, stents, ICDs, and clopidogrel, among others. All of these became multibillion-dollar products. Now there’s a new candidate that just might join this group. I’ll tell you why, but I can’t emphasize strongly enough that right now we only have extremely preliminary information. So be warned. And don’t be completely surprised if it does bomb out. We’ve been down this road before.

As I reported previously (here and here), early on Monday Novartis disclosed that the PARADIGM-HF trial testing LCZ696, a novel, first-in-class Angiotensin Receptor Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI), had been stopped early. As I later found out, the news was even better than Novartis had said in its press release. I spoke with the co-principal investigator of the trial, Milton Packer, who told me that the trial had been stopped because of a highly statistically significant reduction in cardiovascular mortality in patients taking LCZ696 instead of the current gold standard of treatment, an ACE inhibitor. Marc Pfeffer, a cardiologist at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital with long experience in heart failure, told me that he interprets “the stopping of a major clinical outcome trial for effectiveness by an experienced DSMB [Data and Safety Monitoring Board] as indicating that the final results will be both definitive and important.”

The first thing to know is that a reduction in cardiovascular mortality is a really big deal….

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.