More Evidence Linking Sugared Drinks To Diabetes 1

A new study uncovers some potentially important new details about the association between sugared drinks and diabetes.

In a paper published in Diabetologia [pdf], researchers in the UK report on a study of more than 25,000 adults. Over the course of more than 10 years of followup 847 participants went on to develop diabetes. Instead of relying on a food frequency questionnaire, as in most earlier studies…

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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Get Rid of Sugar, Not Salt, Say Authors Reply

Too much negative attention has been focused on salt and not enough on sugar, write two authors in Open Heart. Reviewing the extensive literature on salt and sugar, they write that the adverse effects of salt are less than the adverse effects of sugar. The evidence supporting efforts to reduce salt in the diet is not convincing and we would be far better off reducing sugar instead of salt in the modern diet.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

English: Macro photograph of a pile of sugar (...

The Not So Sweet Facts About Sugar 1

A new study offers a broad overview of the use of sugar in the US diet and its consequent health implications. The good news is that the growth in sugar intake appears to have stopped and may even have slightly declined. The bad news is that people still consume way too much sugar and that that sugar is killing them.

In a paper published in JAMA Internal Medicine, Quanhe Yang, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and colleagues analyze data about sugar use and its health effects from the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) studies.

Click here to read the full story on Forbes. 

English: Macro photograph of a pile of sugar (...
English: Macro photograph of a pile of sugar (saccharose) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Big Sugar Tips The Balance Of The Research Scale Reply

It might seem obvious: people who drink sugar-sweetened beverages are more likely to gain weight or to be obese. Most research supports this intuitive finding. The big exception: when researchers receive support from the sugar and beverage industries they are much less likely to make the connection.

Researchers in Germany and Spain conducted a systematic review of systematic reviews (yep) examining the association between sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain and obesity.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

Sugar Sweetened Beverages

 

Cardiology Goes Better With Coke 3

Diet Coke - get cancer, not fat

At the bottom of this post I’ve reprinted an email cardiologists are receiving from the American College of Cardiology. See the bottom of the message for the disclosure that Coca Cola is paying for this educational program. I don’t have much to say about this though I wonder what the faculty of this program will say about the role of sugared soda and obesity. I also wonder what position the ACC will take on public health efforts to curb sugar consumption.

There’s no reason to be surprised about this. Last year the president of the ACC was one of 22 participants chosen by the Coca-Cola Company to carry the Olympic Flame. And the ACC is far from the only mainstream medical organization to take money from Big Sugar. Coke pays a lot of money to the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute to put a red dress logo on the Diet Coke label and the American Heart Association has struck deals with, among others, Cheetos and Subway.

See Yoni Freedhoff’s Weighty Matters blog for much more about Coca Cola’s efforts to influence medical organizations.

Here’s the ACC email:

The American College of Cardiology is teaming up with the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association (PCNA) to offer Never Too Early, Never Too Late: Cardiovascular Health for Women Throughout the Lifespan, an educational webinar, on Wednesday, August 14th from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EDT. This complimentary webinaroffers a comprehensive view of women’s cardiovascular health as they age. Our expert faculty, Jo-Ann Eastwood, PhD, RN, CCNS, ANCP-BC and Martha Gulati, MD, MS, FACC, will provide perspectives on clinical encounters during the childbearing years, perimenopausal period and in later life, while presenting opportunities to focus on, when indicated, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction, and the session will be moderated by JoAnne Foody, MD, FACC. During this webinar, the educators will encourage clinicians to seek and seize opportunities to discuss optimal cardiovascular management with their women patients in clinical practice settings, and as equally important, to champion them with their colleagues in the primary care and women’s health fields.Webinar highlights include:

  • A look at how gestational diabetes, pregnancy-associated hypertension and preeclampsia predict future CVD risk
  • Exploration into the prevalence of hypertension in women vs. men throughout the lifespan
  • Why gender differences matter with regard to tobacco use and cessation
  • The impact of women’s physical activity level on cardiovascular risk
  • Examples of successful cardiovascular health improvement programs targeted to women in a variety of age cohorts
  • One hour of CME, CNE and RD credit

Click here for additional registration, accreditation and faculty information for this complimentary educational course, Never Too Early, Never Too Late: Cardiovascular Health for Women Throughout the Lifespan. We hope you will join us on August 14th from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. EDT!

This course is being presented by the American College of Cardiology and the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association (PCNA) through an educational grant from